Salary and Cost of Living
There is no legal minimum wage in the private sector. An informal two-tiered labor market ensures high wages for Kuwaiti nationals, most of who are in government white collar or executive positions, while foreign workers, even those in skilled positions, receive substantially lower wages. Recently a visiting Bangladeshi Foreign Minister reported that the Bangladeshi domestic workers earn as little as 20 KD (1 KD = 200 IRS Approx.) per month. There is no legal minimum wage in the country. Non citizens do not receive the same social benefits as citizens and must pay fees for education and health care, which are provided free for all citizens. Private sector wages range from as much 2,500 to 3,000 dinars each month for top managers of large companies to between 200 to 300 dinars for other skilled professionals and no skilled workers. The public sector minimum wage provides a decent standard of living for a worker and family. Wages of unskilled workers in the private sector do not always provide a decent standard of living, with housemaids often making less than 40 dinars per month. To be eligible to sponsor family members for residency, government and private sector workers must receive a minimum wage of 400 dinars per month.

Employers often exploit workers' willingness to accept substandard conditions. Some foreign workers, especially unskilled or semiskilled South Asian workers, live and work much like indentured servants, are unaware of their legal rights, and generally lack the means to pursue a legal remedy. They frequently face contractual disputes and poor working conditions, and may face physical and sexual abuse. Most are in debt to their employers before they arrive in the country and have little choice but to accept the employer's conditions, even if they breach the contractual terms. It is not uncommon for wages to be withheld for a period of months, or to be decreased substantially. Many foreign workers are forced to live in "housing camps," which generally are overcrowded and lack adequate cooking and bathroom facilities. Workers are housed 10 or more to a room in squalid conditions, many without access to adequate running water. The workers are only allowed off the camp compound on company transport or by permission of the employer. Foreign workers' ability to change their employment is limited, and, in some cases, employers' possession of foreign workers' passports allows them to exercise control over such employees. Many foreign workers go heavily into debt and cannot afford to return home.


Cost of living

You can definitely sock away several thousand a year living prudently - not frugally. Cost of living is not unreasonable
Kuwait laws do not allow expatriates to buy house or other properties. Monthly rent for a single bed room flat with a hall and kitchen is about 250 to 300 KD depending on the locality. a two bed room flat with a hall and kitchen will be around 300 to 400 KD. There are many Indian families living in a shared apartment which means two families together will buy a two bedroom flat for rent. This is more economical expect for top managers and other such professionals. Bachelor can share a room/apartment with other 3-4 bachelors for a monthly rent of 75-100 KD per person. There are many Indian messes where bachelors can stay with food for a monthly rent of KD 50 - 60 with 2-3 people in a room. Usually for a single person the monthly food expense will come around 50 - 75 KD.

Transporting

Most people have a car, especially women. However, to get a driving license the required minimum salary is KD 600. You can get a good second hand car for a cost of around 2500 - 3000 KD. Most of the people depend entirely on public transport. However, buses don't run on schedule, and are used largely by the laboring class, workers from Egypt, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and India. Taxis get a bit expensive if you try to use them everyday. Minimum fare is 1kd. You can make arrangements with a private driver to take you to and from work on a daily basis for a flat fee of around 40KD a month (depend on the location and distance).

For a single bachelor, in this current salary scenario, if you are getting a salary of around 300 KD, your monthly spending will be as follows:
Room rent: 100.000 (Sharing with other bachelors)
Food : 50.000 KD
Transport : 40.000 KD
Other expenses : 20.000 KD

If you are with your family, the minimum recommended salary range is 750 KD.
This is only a rough data and the exact expense is totally individual.
As the rules are changing very often, please check with the officials for latest rules and procedures.

Useful Links

Useful Info

Embassy of India

Diplomatic Enclave, Arabian Gulf Street
P.O. Box 1450, Safat-13015, Kuwait
Phone:22530600 , 22530612 - 14<
Fax +965 2525811
Embassy working hours: 0830 hrs to 1700 hrs Consular section working day:
Sunday - Thursday

Working Hours

Affidavit/ Attestation: Submission: 07:45 to 13:00 & 14:00 to 16:00 Delivery: * Normally 45 minutes after submission of document
Passport: Please visit for Timing and Location www.kw.ckgs.in/

Indian Passport & Visa Service Centre

Sharq
Behbahani Tower, 17th Floor,
Sharq, Kuwait
Call : 22440392
Passport Collection : 22440393

Fahaheel

Complex Kais Alghanim, 4th Floor,
Mecca Street in front of Al Anood Complex,
Fahaheel, Kuwait
Call : 22909229

Jleeb Al Shuyoukh

2nd Floor, Jleeb Al Shuyoukh Block 1,
Street 1, Xcite building, Kuwait
Call : 24342428

Application submission and Passport collection between 08:00 hrs to 12:00 hrs in first half and 16:00 hrs to 20:00 hrs in second half from Sunday through Thursday and between 16:00 hrs to 20:00 hrs on Fridays and Saturdays.